Rounded Laguiole knife - Cameroun Ebony and French boxwood handle - stainless steel bolsters View larger

Rounded Laguiole knife - Cameroun Ebony and French boxwood handle - stainless steel bolsters

LFK D12 EB BU MI

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Rounded Laguiole knife - Cameroun Ebony and French boxwood handle - stainless steel bolsters

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133,86 €

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Rounded Laguiole Knife - Traditional Laguiole Knife

Size : 12 cm (4,73 in) closed / 21,5 cm (8,47 in) opened

Raw material of the handle : Natural Cameroun Ebony and French Boxwood

Bolsters : 2 stainless steel bolsters

Raw material of the blade : Stainless steel blade 12C27

No dishwasher

Ebony is found in tropical regions and has been known since highest Antiquity for its deep black wood.
At the time of the pharaohs, ebony was already used for the manufacture of tiny precious objects of all kinds, many examples of which were found on opening the ancient tombs.

Ebony belongs to the category of precious wood species. It mainly comes from Mali, but it is also found in Ghana and Togo.

Due to its exceptional hardness, the diminutive size of the tree, its density and its relatively high price, objects crafted in ebony are very few and far between.

Ebony is traditionally used to make piano and harpsichord keys, and sometimes even for the tuning pegs on cellos and guitars. Some splendid examples of chess sets belonging to seasoned collectors have black pieces made out of ebony and white ones made out of box.

To give a gift of a Laguiole knife with an ebony handle is to give away a treasure and a slice of eternity. Ebony is a species of timeless quality and durability!

BOXWOOD

Buxus is a genus of about 70 species in the family Buxaceae. Common names include box or boxwood.

The boxes are native to western and southern Europe, southwest, southern and eastern Asia, Africa, Madagascar, northernmost South America, Central America, Mexico and the Caribbean, with the majority of species being tropical or subtropical; only the European and some Asian species are frost-tolerant. Centres of diversity occur in Cuba (about 30 species), China (17 species) and Madagascar (9 species).

They are slow-growing evergreen shrubs and small trees, growing to 2–12 m (rarely 15 m) tall. The leaves are opposite, rounded to lanceolate, and leathery; they are small in most species, typically 1.5–5 cm long and 0.3–2.5 cm broad, but up to 11 cm long and 5 cm broad in B. macrocarpa. The flowers are small and yellow-green, monoecious with both sexes present on a plant. The fruit is a small capsule 0.5–1.5 cm long (to 3 cm in B. macrocarpa), containing several small seeds.

The genus splits into three genetically distinct sections, each section in a different region, with the Eurasian species in one section, the African (except northwest Africa) and Madagascan species in the second, and the American species in the third. The African and American sections are genetically closer to each other than to the Eurasian section.

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